TB@BOS: Bogaerts makes a diving grab on a hard liner

CLEVELAND -- The return of shortstop Stephen Drew on Monday night meant that Xander Bogaerts started his first game of the season at third base.

Though Bogaerts could still be the shortstop of the future for the Red Sox, and might even play a bit there this season, he will stick with the hot corner for the time being.

"There's going to be some initial adjustment because of either one less hop or a more reactionary position," said Red Sox manager John Farrell. "Our approach in games with the alignment would be, at least in the short term, to have him at third base every day. When Stephen is not in the lineup, we'll have someone else at shortstop, whether that's [Jonathan] Herrera or [Brock] Holt just for a matter of continuity, at least in the first number of games with Xander at third base, just to avoid the bouncing back."

Bogaerts will try to do as much early work as possible in the coming days to reacclimate himself to a position he proved to be adept at last season.

Drew said he spoke with Bogaerts directly about the situation.

"I talked to him, just me and him," said Drew. "I was kind of in the same boat in Arizona with [Craig] Counsell there and me coming up. Basically it's going to hopefully make the team better. That's the reason why they look at it -- going back to last year, he played really well at third. It's not that he can't play short. I just think it makes the club better. We're fine. I talked to him. I know what it felt like when I was that age with Counsell. I gave him my advice there and we're on the same page."

Brock Holt, who has provided continuity in the leadoff position, will play first base until Sunday, when Mike Napoli returns from the disabled list.

When Napoli comes back, Holt could see some action in the outfield while roaming around the infield.

Buchholz's simulated game pushed to weekend

ATL@BOS: Farrell on placing Buchholz on the DL

CLEVELAND -- The plan for Clay Buchholz to pitch a simulated game Monday was tweaked, as the Red Sox instead decided to have the right-hander work on his mechanical adjustments in the bullpen.

The righty is on the disabled list with a hyperextended left knee, but is also spending the down time to try to bounce back from one of the worst stretches of his career.

"We've adjusted the plan that we originally set out to take advantage of the time right now to keep working on the delivery items that have been identified," said manager John Farrell. "There was some work down in the bullpen today. There will be another bullpen on Wednesday with that [simulated] game being pushed back to Saturday now."

Buchholz could go on a Minor League rehab assignment once he pitches the sim game.

"Yeah, and we're kind of looking at this in phases and once we get through the simulated game, we'll take a closer look in what the next, best steps are at that time," Farrell said.

Another starting pitcher who is getting over an injury and inconsistency is lefty Felix Doubront, who has been sidelined since May 21 with a left shoulder strain.

Doubront threw a bullpen session Monday.

"We're going to continue to ramp up the number of pitches thrown," said Farrell. "We'll start to incorporate some simulated innings before we get him out on a date for a rehab assignment. That's not been identified yet."

Carp to miss few weeks; Nava returns

BOS@ATL: Carp takes a pitch off his foot

CLEVELAND -- Red Sox first baseman/outfielder Mike Carp, who has a fractured right foot, is in a walking boot and will miss at least a few weeks.

"He's in a boot for a week," said manager John Farrell. "He's going to need an additional week of rehab following that before he begins baseball activities. We're still a little ways away before he's back to us."

Though Jonny Gomes has taken over as the primary left fielder, Carp's injury did open the door for Daniel Nava to be recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket again just two days after he was sent down.

For whatever reason, Nava hasn't been able to find the stroke that made him an invaluable player for the Red Sox last year.

"He is working hard to get that stroke that was so productive a year ago," Farrell said. "We know there's a good hitter in there. The bottom-line results haven't been maybe what he's realized and produced in the times that he's been in the big leagues, particularly last year. He was part of the most productive left field in baseball last year. And we're working to get that back and he provides the same versatility defensively and yet we've got to get him back on track swinging the bat."